Writing Convincing Arguments

Test WritingWriting Convincing Arguments*

“You cannot convince a confused person, so keep things tidy and ordered.”

Reading Critically

“When you read, ask yourself questions like

  • “What is the author trying to prove?”
  • “What is the author assuming I will agree with?”
  • Do you agree with the author?
  • Does the author adequately defend her argument?
  • What kind of proof does she use?
  • Is there something she leaves out that you would put in?

Does putting it in hurt her argument?

As you get used to reading critically, you will start to see the sometimes hidden agendas of other writers, and you can use this skill to improve your own ability to craft effective arguments.”

Here are two outlines showing the most common placement of the counter-argument. The first is probably the most common.

    1. Introduction
    2. Supporting point #1
    3. Supporting point #2
    4. Supporting point #3
    5. Supporting point #4

[there can be any number of supporting points]

  1. Counter-argument
  2. Rebuttal
  3. Conclusion
    1. Counter-argument, which also serves as introduction
    2. Rebuttal, which would usually include the thesis statement
    3. Supporting point #1
    4. Supporting point #2
    5. Supporting point #3
    6. Supporting point #4

[there can be any number of supporting points]

  1. Conclusion

*Excerpted from “What is a Counter Argument?” UNC Writing Center

Also see Values Influence Reading Writing and Viewing

 

 

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