Write Right Away

Get' em Writing about Themselves Looking for ways to get to know your students while having them do authentic writing that builds on works you've read?  Here are three ideas to consider that can serve as a beginning of the year formative assessments of reading and writing.  No need to…

Talk Teaches

Sentence Starters Invigorate Conversation   Guided talking teaches students to think, listen, and rethink. Observing students talking teaches teachers what they need to teach next.  Here's a flyer with SENTENCE STARTERS from I found on Pinterest that may be just what you need to jump start conversations between and among students.…

Evaluating Proposed Solutions

Educators today are using blogs as a way for students to practice writing persuasive and argumentative essays based on current events.  Some middle and high school teachers are not sure how to guide their students in ways that will assure the proposed solutions backed by solid evidence.  Some students are unclear about how…

Digital Storytelling

Cross-Curricular Writing Teachers in elective courses sometimes struggle to design lessons that teach the content and skills of their courses when students are challenged by the demands of the required courses. Consider drawing on content matter from other courses as you teach the information and skills related to your course. Here's…

Activating Strategies for Reading

Reading: Activating Thinking Here is a chart strategies to get students thinking about new units, new books, or new readings.  Many are interactive and though they come from a site prepared for elementary school students most can be adapted for use with students of all ages.  You'll recognize many ideas that are commonly…

Making Masks to Reveal Character

Why Did They Do That? Students sometimes miss the significance of a fictional character's behavior because these inexperienced readers may have missed direct and/or indirect characterization clues authors incorporate to show what motivates their characters to act or reaction they way they do.  This is especially true with indirect characterization. Consider in-class activities…